The Madness Begins

March 15, 2010

I can’t believe Temple got the #5 seed while Nova got a #2. Georgetown played really well down the stretch, by the way. That was a great Big East final.

I took my boys to the penn-cornell ivy league championship game in november. that was fun, at franklin field. i still can’t believe penn won at harvard.

cornell won the ivy over harvard barely, but they have to play temple in the first round, and temple is very, very good this year, that’s a bad draw for cornell. temple almost never loses in the first round of the ncaa. coming out of the bracket, temple has uphill all the way, but texas might actually beat kentucky, although john calipari has to be the best coach on the planet, he used to torture temple when he was at umass, he drove john chaney crazy.

also, i like richmond to win their first round game, and then upset villanova in the 2d round. richmond has a really good team and nova never plays well in the tournament. jay wright is a horrible tournament coach. richmond gave temple all they could handle inthe a10 final and richmond beat temple in the regular season. richmond is a great team this year, much better than a #7 seed. that’s a 2-7 matchup that’s bad for nova.

i was watching spike lee on 30-30 on espn on that reggie miller thing and 3 points.

first, reggie miller has to be the most overrated player in NBA history.  he could only do one thing, the three point jumper, and that was it.  He did it well, but he couldn’t pass, penetrate, dunk, rebound, run, steal or do any of the other things that an NBA Hall of Fame guy does.

second, Patrick Ewing, for all his greatness, came up short in two of the biggest games of his life, game 7 against Hakeem in the NBA finals, and the NCAA title game against Villanova in 1985, of which this is the 25th anniversary of Nova upsetting Georgetown, or Patrick Ewing choking unbelievably, depending on how you look at it.  Based on how awful Ewing was in his NBA finals against Hakeem, i’d bet Nova could have beaten Georgetown in a 7 game series, and, in fact, Nova did handle Georgetown if not outright beat them pretty well that season in Big East play.

Third, Spike Lee claimed “New York is the cradle of basketball.”

Uh, Spike, New York is the cradle of incredible wealth and incredible poverty, a lot of models and caviar and restaurants, and some good hoops players, but PHILLY is the cradle of liberty and hoops, pal.

ALL the great hoops players (and jazz players) have been from philly, not NY.  Earl the Pearl Monroe, Wilt the Stilt Chamberlain, Rasheed Wallace, Tyreke Evans, Kobe Bryant, the list is endless.

John Coltrane is from Philly.  Dizzy Gillespie grew up here.  Lee Morgan was from Philly.  Philly Jo Jones.  Hank Mobley, McCoy Tyner, Archie Shepp, Byard Lancaster, Mickey Roker, Bill Harris, Calvin Massey.  Are You Kidding Me?????

Philly is like the Jazz/Hoops capital of the earth.  Doesn’t anyone remember Grover Washington Jr playing the national anthem at Sixers games? and he was like the WORST sax guy ever to come out of philly!  and he was great!  but hey, he was no JOHN COLTRANE soloing for hours on soprano sax!

Dr. J played here for TWELVE YEARS.  He played in New York for four years.  New Yorkers like to remember that it was longer, but hey, too bad.

We were at the Palestra the other week and there were no less than several HUNDRED NBA all stars who played their high school ball in philly pasted on the walls there.  Maybe a thousand.  Maybe more.  I couldn’t count them all.  That doesn’t count the guys who were kept out of the league for gambling, or who blew out their knees, or just didn’t have the grades to go to college.

It’s not even close–Philly v. NY in hoops is like PROS V JOES–NY being the JOES.

Oh, and by the way, Alex Rodriguez took steroids and needed an instant replay to win the world series last year.

And I didn’t see him tying Reggie “Reggie Bar” Jackson’ HR record of 5 dingers in a World Series like Chase Utley did–and Chase being about 1/2 the size of Reggie, by the way, who was enormously strong and had arms like a bricklayer.

Hey, the Yankees are great.  But Philly’s got the Hoops.  Even the guys at Sports Center know it’s Philly when it comes to Hoops.

And when was the last time a NY university made it into the NCAA exactly?

Columbia never gets in.  NYU doesn’t have a team.  St. Johns has fallen off dramatically.  Syracuse is way upstate.  CCNY had its glory days when the court was surrounded by caged wire fences.

In all the years, NY had exactly one great player–Kareem Abdul Jabbar, aka Lew Alcindor.  But he hates NY.  He changed his name, became a Muslim, and never goes back to NY.  He’s become such an LA/Cali guy, you’d never know he was a NY guy to begin with.

But i loved the guy in Enter the Dragon with Bruce Lee, doing kung fu and all.  Now that was awesome–way better than Wilt in that Conan movie.

–art k, philly

According to recent news reports, the Federal Oncology Commission, headed by the Earle Warren Orchestra and Dr. Earle Warren on saxophone, will issue a report this morning that the immediate cause of Sen. Kennedy’s death was a lone cancer cell, acting alone, without the assistance of other cancer cells, and that any hint that the cancer cell acted in conspiracy or with the assistance of other cancer cells is silly and ridiculous.

Also, there were no cancer cells in the grassy knoll.

Sen. Kennedy’s three older brothers were great men–joe jr. gave his life for his country in wwII, JFK was a great president, a princeton man who transferred to Harvard and graduated from there, and was known to have romanced the actresses gene tierney, marilyn monroe as well as his gorgeous wife jackie o, all in one spectacular lifetime, not to mention saying “ich bin ein Berliner.”

There were a lot of bad things that happened to Sen. Ted Kennedy along the road in life.  But we forgave them all, and in the end, he was a Great Man.

All in all, the great outweighed the bad in Ted Kennedy, and he was in fact, a Great Man, and a Great Senator.

He was a lot like nolan ryan, about half wins, half losses, and his fastball was great, but his wild pitches and walks would cost you ballgames, but when he was great, he was really, truly great.

Abraham Martin & John by DION

Has anybody here seen my old friend Abraham,
Can you tell me where he’s gone?
He freed a lotta people, but it seems the good die young
But I just looked around and he’s gone.

Has anybody here seen my old friend John,
Can you tell me where he’s gone?
He freed a lotta people, but it seems the good die young
But I just looked around and he’s gone.

Has anybody here seen my old friend Martin,
Can you tell me where he’s gone?
He freed a lotta people, but it seems the good die young
But I just looked around and he’s gone.

Didn’t you love the things they stood for?
Didn’t they try to find some good for you and me?
And we’ll be free,
Someday soon it’s gonna be one day.

Has anybody here seen my old friend Bobby,
Can you tell me where he’s gone?
I thought I saw him walkin’ up over the hill
With Abraham, Martin and John

NEW LAST VERSE FOR TEDDY:

Has anybody here seen my old friend Teddy,
Can you tell me where he’s gone?
I thought I saw him walkin’ up over the hill
With Abraham, Martin, Bobby & John….
He freed a lotta people, but it seems the good they die young
But I just looked around and he was gone.

http://www.uulyrics.com/music/dion/song-abraham-martin-john/

–art kyriazis, philly/south jersey
home of the world champion phillies

Collectively, the Big Five of Temple, LaSalle, Penn, Villanova and St Joes have made more than a dozen final four appearances since the NCAAs began in 1939; Villanova was in the first NCAA tourney back in 1939, and in every decade of the NCAAs, one or more of the big Five has had an impact on the tournament each and every decade the Tournament has been running, whether it was Temple getting to the Final Four twice in the fifties, St. Joe’s to the Final Four in the sixties, Villanova and Penn to the Final Four in the seventies, Villanova winning the NCAA in the 80s, Temple dominating and getting #1 rankings and seedings in the 80s and 90s and getting to the elite 8 three times, and Villanova getting #1 seeds and reaching the elite 8 in recent years, and St. Joes getting to the final four in the last decade and getting a #1 seed.

Folks, we have the best college basketball in the country, bar none. Collectively, the Big Five does better in NCAA than almost any other region or school, excepting possibly Duke, UCLA, Kentucky and a handful of other such bigtime programs–and yet Duke has only won three NCAA titles in 14 Final Four trips, etc. The Big Five is not doing so badly.

I really like the underdogs of the NCAA–Marquette in 1977 with Al McGuire, the late Jimmy Valvano and North Caroline State (who can forget the triple overtime opening round win over Pepperdine?) in 1983, Rollie Massimino and the Villanova Wildcats upending Patrick Ewing and Georgetown in 1986, and so on.

My personal favorite big five upset of all time has to be St. Joe’s beating #1 seed and #1 in the country DePaul and Mark Aguire in 1981 in the first round of the NCAA (maybe it was the 2d round).

This brings us to 2009. Villanova and Temple are in. Villanova had a very good season, but lost to Louisville in the semis of the Big East tournament. Nova’ had a good RPI and a good strength of schedule, but still, they got a #3 seed, which I thought was pretty generous for a team that really hadn’t won anything–they were third or fourth in their conference, and finished third/fourth in the tournament of their conference. Even if it’s the best conference in basketball, does finishing fourth in that conference make you the 12th best team in all of college basketball? I think a #4 seed would have been more appropriate. The NCAA worships the big east a little too much.

Next, Temple. Temple got an #11 seed, which puts them against Arizona State, a #6 seed. Now Temple actually won something–they won the A-10 Tournament. Second year in a row, in fact. Also, best player in the conference, Dionte Christmas, plays for Temple. Also, Temple has by far the toughest non-conference schedule of any A-10 team. But they beat all of those teams too, except maybe Villanova, and they gave them a tough time. Maybe if Nova’ didn’t insist on playing at the Pavilion, but at the Palestra, it would be a fair game.

Temple’s RPI is very good, and their strength of schedule is very good. In fact, if you look at most of the teams seeded from around #7-#10, Temple’s RPI and strength of schedule are BETTER than most of those 7-10 seeds. Take Michigan for example, a team that didn’t win anything, lost 13, won only 20, and was an at-large from the big 10. Michigan has a higher seed than Temple but why? Michigan’s RPI is worse, their strength of schedule much worse, and they have a much worse record than Temple.

I could pick out many more examples (UCLA?) of this, but the point is that Temple plays a big-time schedule, has been in the elite eight in three of the last twenty years, and has been ranked #1 more than once in the last twenty years, including most of 1987-88. They’re a good ballclub, and deserved at least an 8-9 seed matchup in the first round.

Frankly, i would have given Temple about the same seeding as Xavier, and higher than Dayton, a team Temple dominated during the season.

I believe Temple and Villanova will both win. Arizona State is a fine team and that game could go either way, but Temple will win this year. Villanova has a ridiculously easy first round game. Their second round matchup will be much tougher

Also, I really like the fact that the new President offered his own “bracketology” on ESPN. that was pretty cool. I don’t think we’ve had this sports minded a president since Jack Kennedy, an old football player, was going to the harvard-yale and army-navy games. A lot like Teddy Roosevelt, too.

–art kyriazis philly/south jersey
home of the world champion phillies

One of my beloved professors from college passed away recently, Professor Samuel P. Huntington, late of Harvard University. He was prolific, having written numerous books and articles, and was famous for his theories of political development. He wrote one of my most important letters of reference to graduate school and we had a good relationship. I liked him, he liked me, and I truly enjoyed the advanced graduate level seminar I took with him my senior year of college.

The paper I wrote for him in the seminar, the one which so impressed him that he wrote me a letter of reference for graduate school, Huntingon later used some of the ideas from in part for his famous paper published in 1993 in Foreign Affairs on the Clash of Civilizations; my original seminar paper had argued that older theories of political development emphasizing secularization as the main engine of modernization were now obsolete in light of the Iranian revolution and the rise of Islamic fundamentalism, and that new theories were needed to take account of modernizations which utilized traditional and charismatic authorities such as religion and ethnic identities to bind together national feelings.

That paper and that seminar were timely for Huntington; he had just come off the State Department desk that spring from the catastrophe of the botched helicopter rescue in the Carter-Vance State Department as Undersecretary of State, and he was in the mood for reflection on past ideas which no longer seemed to work in the modern revolutionary-terrorist world. Huntington’s long road to his new paradigms began in that seminar room that spring and he had invited comment from all of us on not merely Iran but a number of subjects which were established in the political science pantheon. He was in a rare mood for an established professor; he was actually listening to what his students had to say, which was a rare and precious commodity for an academic long established at Harvard.

Huntington, who had long advocated the secularist and praetorian schools of modernism and political development, slowly developed, articulated and adopted these new views with a vengeance, and as a consequence, his article on the “Clash of Civilizations” became the most cited article in Foreign Affairs since the publication of George F. Kennan’s containment article in 1947. It was the novelty and willingness to ascend new theoretical ground that gave Huntington’s article such oomph.

Huntington’s later followup books and articles were all celebrated by the media and by the academy. What is striking about Huntington’s work (as opposed to mine or anyone else’s) is the thoroughness of the academic references and the depth of research and academic work that went into the new theories. He essentially developed a new paradigm for looking at developmental theory in the Kuhnian sense of that word, and did so in a way that captured the imagination of many scholars and many popular thinkers. This was a substantive achievement, especially coming from someone so closely identified with the Cold War establishment.

But Huntington did not merely throw out a new theory, as so many academics do today in papers; he erected an edifice, complete with substructure, foundation and plenty of academic digging to support what he had built in his article. It was so complete once he showed it to the world, it was readily apparent he had been working on it for more than ten years. It rapidly became his life’s capping achievement.

Huntington’s willingness to change and be flexible with his core beliefs and his core dogmas at such a late date in his academic career marked him as a scholar of the first rank. Most scholars develop one or two ideas when they are young, and then are afraid or unwilling to deviate from them later in life. Huntington was willing to risk all, because he saw that his earlier theories and ideas might be wrong, and went about searching for a new theory, a new paradigm, which would better explain the facts in the world about him.

He was, in a world, an empirical scientist of the first magnitude. Like Galileo and Copernicus, when he saw the data that proved the earth was not the center of the universe, he was unafraid to change his point of view and advance theories in keeping with what he saw and what he heard, instead of repeating theories he had learned or that he had advanced decades earlier which might have applied to different circumstances.

Professor Huntington was of old New England stock and proud of his heritage. His namesake was once President of the United States in Congress Assembled and had presided over the Continental Congress under the Articles of Confederation prior to the ratification of the United States Constitution during the very earliest years of American Independence. Huntington himself served several Presidents and administrations in various capacities and was noted for his acumen and wisdom.

He was a wonderful Professor, a good man, and I shall miss him. And most of all, he was a brilliant academic and a social scientist of the first order. In every way, and every day, he was a Harvard man. He was very much my notion of what a Harvard Professor should be, and for that reason too, I shall miss him also. It is doubtful that any like he shall pass this way again.

–Art Kyriazis Philly/South Jersey
Home of the World Champion Phillies
Happy New Year 2009

PS

This is Professor Huntington’s official biography from the Harvard College website:

[cite to and cited from]

http://www.gov.harvard.edu/faculty/shuntington/

Samuel P. Huntington is the Albert J. Weatherhead III University Professor. He graduated with distinction from Yale at age 18, served in the Army, and then received his Ph.D. from Harvard and started teaching there when he was 23. He has been a member of Harvard’s Department of Government since 1950 (except for a brief period between 1959 and 1962 when he was associate professor of government at Columbia University). He has served as chairman of the Government Department and of the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. His principal interests are: national security, strategy, and civil military relations; democratization and political and economic development of less-developed countries; cultural factors in world politics; and American national identity. During 1977 and 1978 he worked at the White House as coordinator of security planning for the National Security Council. He was a founder and coeditor for seven years of the journal Foreign Policy. His principal books include The Soldier and the State: The Theory and Politics of Civil-Military Relations (1957); The Common Defense: Strategic Programs in National Politics (1961); Political Order in Changing Societies (1968); American Politics: The Promise of Disharmony (1981); The Third Wave: Democratization in the Late Twentieth Century (1991); The Clash of Civilizations and Remaking of World Order (1996); and Who Are We? The Challenges to America’s National Identity (2004).

The clash between Eagles head coach Andy Reid and his former assistant coach (and now Minnesota Head Coach) and good friend Brad Childress in the playoffs yesterday highlights a new trend in the NFL—the Philadelphia Eagles family of coaches in the NFL. First, there are the Buddy Ryan assistant coaches—Jon Gruden, formerly of Oakland (where he went to the Super Bowl) and now of Tampa Bay (where he also went to the Super Bowl, and narrowly missed the playoffs this year) and Jeff Fischer of Tennessee, the NFL’s longest tenured coach, who is the AFC’s top seeded team this year, a regular playoff contender, and a former Super Bowl coach and AFC champion. Former Eagles head coach and Buddy Ryan assistant coach Ray Rhodes continues to work as an assistant coach in the league. Buddy Ryan’s two sons now are assistant coaches in the league. Second, there are the ex-Eagles—such as Herm Edwards of Kansas City, and former head coach Dick Vermeil, who used to coach at St. Louis, and won a Super Bowl there. Ex-Eagle John Bunting was a college head coach at North Carolina. And then you have the Andy Reid connections–Harbaugh at Baltimore, who used to coach special teams with the Eagles, and all the connections of Reid through Green Bay as well as Philly like Childress at Minnesota and Holmgren in Seattle.

There are probably many more connections to the Eagles that could be found, but it certainly is illuminating how many coaches and assistant coaches in the NFL (and in the college ranks) now have philly ties. And we used to think this was a college hoops town with a lot of college and pro hoops coaches everywhere. Who knew we were a spawning ground for college coaches. Guess it’s a spawning ground of football coaches as well for the NFL.

–art kyriazis philly/south jersey
home of the world champion phillies
Happy New Year 2009

On a cold, windswept day at Harvard Coliseum, the 125th edition of what is known only as “The Game” unfolded last Saturday between ultimate college football rivals Harvard and Yale.

The weather conditions were brutally fine for smashmouth football; twenty degrees fahrenheit with a wind chill of minus twenty, but a bright and sunny day, and a sell-out crowd.

I had been scheduled to go up to Boston and attend, but the sudden snowstorm in Philadelphia (eight inches on Friday) kept me at home, where I watched the game with my family on the cable station VERSUS.

In a hard-hitting contest, Harvard took an early 7-0 lead, after a long opening drive in the first quarter, and then stunned the stadium by kicking an onsides kick, which they recovered. They then continued on offense for almost all of the first quarter, wearing down the Yale Defense. The Yale Defense, I believe, although they played valiantly, had to be gassed during the rest of the first half from that long first quarter. But Yale gave up no points and played valiant defense, and made Harvard give up the ball.

Yale and Harvard then held on in what soon became a defensive battle. As Harvard alum and 40th Reunion attendee TOMMY LEE JONES looked on from the stands live and in person, the Harvard team repelled Yale’s every advance, until Yale got close on one occasion, only to stop Yale from getting a touchdown within the ten yardline.

When Yale kicked however, they missed the field goal. Harvard likewise drove deep into Yale territory, but Harvard, too, missed the field goal due to the winds swirling and howling about the stadium.

Finally, on a drive later in the game, Harvard penetrated deep into Yale territory. It seemed they would get a touchdown, but did not. Finally, they succeeded in kicking the field goal after two prior failures and making it a 10-0 game, and thus a two score game.

Yale was yet valiant, penetrating again deep into harvard territory, but the game was finally decided when the Yale QB, on a goal-line stand that lasted six plays within the Harvard five yard line, on the seventh play, was rushed and tackled from behind and sacked, the ball coming loose in a fumble, and Harvard recovered the ball, and was then able to run out the clock with approximately three minutes left.

Ode to Joy from Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony was the order of the day as Harvard, Sweet Harvard, emerged victorious from the historic scrum.

But to paraphrase the great Grantland Rice, it’s not whether you win or lose, but how you play the game, and after the epic contest was over, both teams exchanged handshakes in what can only be considered a great act of gentlemanliness and sportsmanship. Both teams played well and valiantly, and we can be proud that our nations’ finest universities are producing such fine athletes and minds.

–art kyriazis, proud harvard alum, Ivy League Football Champions 2008
philadelphia/south jersey
HOME OF THE WORLD CHAMPION PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES 2008

I’m going to go out on a limb here and predict that Harvard will beat Yale this weekend at Harvard Stadium, and also Harvard will find itself with a share of the Ivy League title for the second year in a row.

Ironically, November 22, 2008 also marks the 45th anniversary of the assassination of our former Harvard graduate and president John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963.

Go Crimson!

art kyriazis, philly/south jersey
HOME OF THE WORLD CHAMPION PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES

Ryan Fitzpatrick, who was the quarterback for Harvard the year that Harvard went undefeated and untied during the early half of this decade, and who has had a respectable career as a pro quarterback primarily as a backup in St. Louis and some other teams, has been playing quarterback for Cincinnati while Carson Palmer was hurt.

On Sunday, November 16, 2008, against an Eagles defense that sacked him six times and pressured him or hurried him at least twenty other times, Fitzpatrick managed to hang in there and lead the 1-8 Bengals to a tie against the heavily favored Philadelphia Eagles. At the very end of overtime, Fitzpatrick led the Bengals on a game-winning drive down the field, and left his field-goal kicker with a makeable 46-yard field goal attempt to win the game with approximately ten seconds left in overtime, which the field-goal kicker missed slightly to the right by about five feet.

Although a lot of people are going to say that McNabb and the Eagles lost this game, here at the Sophist, we believe there are two sides to every question. Consequently, I’m going to take the other point of view and say that Ryan Fitzpatrick, former Harvard QB and an Ivy League champion almost every year he started for the Crimson, was the real winner on Sunday. Against one of the league’s best defenses, he made some great throws and hung in there all day. He gets my game ball.

Incidentally, Ryan Fitzpatrick and the Bengals gave the Steelers a tough game for at least a half before losing in the second half, and that was on a short week on the road playing at pittsburgh. Nor did Rothlisberger play much better than McNabb. Pittsburgh’s running game also had trouble against Cincinnati.

Bottom line: this means that Harvard football won twice in one weekend. You don’t see that happen all that often anymore!

Look for Ryan Fitzpatrick to run for political office when his playing days are done…….

–art kyriazis, philly/south jersey
HOME OF THE WORLD SERIES CHAMPION PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES

It was one of the most famous games every played in college football history—the famous 29-29 tie between Harvard and Yale in November of 1968. Down by sixteen points with less than two minutes to go, against unbeated and untied Yale (with Brian Dowling and Calvin Hill), Harvard (with Tommy Lee Jones) managed to score a touchdown, then scored a two point converstion, then kicked the onsides kick.

Then with less than a minute, Harvard recovered a fumble by a Yale player named Bradford Lee (later a professor at Harvard and now at the Naval War College in Rhode Island), Harvard recovered the ball, and scored another TD and another two point conversion to miraculously tie the game as time ran out.

The next day the Harvard Crimson headline ran its famous headline, “Harvard beats Yale 29-29.”

It should be noted here that “Brian Dowling” was the model for the famous “B.D.” the helmeted football player in Gary Trudeau’s long running comic strip Doonesbury, although neither Doonesbury nor its core charaters have aged well. Doonesbury’s best character was probably “Uncle Duke”, based expressly on the late Hunter S. Thompson, but with Thomson’s death, the character had to end. The cartoon has meandered since then, and many graphic artists are much more hip and contemporary these days.

It must be nice to be married to Jane Pauley, though.

Now, according to the New York Times and other major web sources, this movie will debut Friday this weekend, and the events of that game have been dramatized in a what has become a major documentary film.

The principals of the game have been interviewed along intercutting of rare footage of the game and of the time period.

This should be one really neat film, if for no other reason than that Tommy Lee Jones, who played in the game and was an all-Ivy League linebacker, will clearly be one of the people featured in the film.

Director Rafferty, a Harvard grad, has done an excellent job with this film, which recaptures an innocent time of our past, and also recaptures a simpler spirit of athletic endeavor and competition. In that sense he refreshes us all and recalls the poem “To an Athlete Dying Young,” in that youth and the competition are for many of us the high point of memories of a lifetime.

Go see this film. Harvard wins in the end, 29-29. Ode to Joy!!!!!

–art kyriazis, philly/south jersey
HOME OF THE WORLD CHAMPION PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES

In a game with huge Ivy League title implications, Harvard defeated Penn over the weekend at Penn’s Franklin Field on Saturday, November 15. Penn outgained the Crimson almost 2-1 in overall yardage, but turnovers hurt the Quakers and Harvard made some big plays and got some big stops; a crucial missed field goal of about thirty yards also hurt the Quakers badly in the final tally. It was the second straight time that Harvard has won as a visitor at Franklin Field (they also won in 2006); prior to winning these past two contests, Harvard had not won a football game on the road at Franklin Field for approximately twenty years and change. This is certainly the start of an unusual trend. Also, it makes Penn-Cornell next week just a rivalry game, while Harvard-Yale, “The Game”, is now loaded with Ivy League title implications.

Minor Observation: Harvard never lost to Yale during the Lawrence Summers Presidency. No other Harvard President went undefeated to Yale during his Presidency in the Game.

–art kyriazis, philly/south jersey
HOME OF THE WORLD CHAMPION PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES